Researchers use algorithm from Netflix challenge to speed up biological imaging

14.03. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Researchers have repurposed an algorithm originally developed for Netflix's 2009 movie preference prediction competition to create a method for acquiring classical Raman spectroscopy images of biological tissues at unprecedented speeds. The advance could make the simple, label-free imaging method practical for clinical applications such as tumor detection or tissue analysis.

Research paves the way for next generation of optical tweezers

14.03. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Scientists have developed a pioneering new technique that could pave the way for the next generation of optical tweezers.

Recovering scattered data from twisted light via ‘scattering-matrix-assisted retrieval technique (SMART)’

14.03. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

High-capacity optical communication can be accomplished by multiplexing multiple light-carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) channels. However, in turbulent environments, optical scattering and 'speckle patterns' occur due to ambient, atmospheric microparticles and significantly decrease the orthogonality between OAM channels, demultiplexing (extracting information) and increasing crosstalk during communication. In a recent study now published in Light: Science & Applications, Lei Gong and co-workers at the departments of optics and optical engineering, medical engineering, electrical engineering and physical sciences in China and the USA developed a 'scattering-matrix-assisted retrieval technique' (SMART) to efficiently recover scattered data from multiplexed OAM channels. In the study, they used 24 OAM channels in parallel, passing through a scattering medium to demultiplex the channels from the scattered optical fields and achieve minimal experimental crosstalk approximating -13.8 dB.

Designing next-generation optical antennas

13.03. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Antennas catch radio waves, a form of electromagnetic radiation, from the air and convert the energy into electrical signals that feed modern telecommunications. They can also convert electrical signals into radio waves. Without antennas, the world would be a much different place than it is today. Optical engineers and scientists like Anthony J. Hoffman, associate professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, are working toward leveraging these devices to control light instead of radio waves.

Virtual time-lapse photos can capture ultrafast phenomena with any camera

13.03. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

EPFL scientists have developed a new image-processing method that can capture extremely rapid phenomena using any type of camera. Their method, called the Virtual Frame Technique, delivers better performance than any commercial high-speed camera and is affordable and accessible to anyone.

An electronically tunable metasurface that rotates polarization

12.03. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Researchers at the University of Michigan and City University of New York have recently proposed and experimentally validated a transparent, electronically tunable metasurface. This metasurface, presented in a paper published in Physical Review X, can rotate the polarization of an arbitrarily polarized incident wave without changing its axial ratio.

Finger-mounted optical probe designed to improve breast cancer removal

12.03. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Researchers have developed the first wearable probe that enhances the sense of touch by imaging and quantifying the stiffness and elasticity of biological tissue. The device is being developed to improve the surgical removal of breast cancer and might also be useful for brain and liver surgery and other types of cancer.

New microscopy method could improve LASIK surgery

12.03. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

A team of University of Maryland bioengineering researchers have developed a microscopy technique that could one day be used to improve LASIK and eliminate the "surgery" aspect of the procedure. Their findings were published today in Physical Review Letters.

Ultrathin and ultrafast: Scientists pioneer new technique for two-dimensional material analysis

11.03. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Discovery allows scientists to look at how 2-D materials move with ultrafast precision.

Space radiation detector can help to spot fake masterpieces

11.03. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Technology originally developed for CERN's Large Hadron Collider and then flown in space by ESA is now being used to analyse historic artworks, helping to detect forgeries.

Shooting movies in atoms

08.03. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Researchers of the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics at LMU and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics have developed a microscope that tracks the motion of electrons.

Breakthrough could enable cheaper infrared cameras

07.03. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

There's an entire world our eyes miss, hidden in the ranges of light wavelengths that human eyes can't see. But infrared cameras can pick up the secret light emitted as plants photosynthesize, as cool stars burn and batteries get hot. They can see through smoke and fog and plastic.

New photography approach gives traditional cameras ultra-high imaging speeds

07.03. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Researchers have developed a new imaging method that can capture images at speeds of up to 1.5 million frames per second using standard imaging sensors typically limited to 100 frames per second. This new technology will make it possible to capture extremely fast events for applications such as biomedical research or slow-motion scenes in a film.

New research could revolutionise fiber-optic communications

07.03. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

A team of researchers from the University of St Andrews has achieved a breakthrough in the measurement of lasers which could revolutionise the future of fiber-optic communications.

Deep learning merges advantages of holography and bright-field microscopy for 3-D imaging

07.03. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Digital holographic microscopy is an imaging modality that can digitally reconstruct the images of 3-D samples from a single hologram by digitally refocusing it through the entire 3-D sample volume. In comparison, scanning through a sample volume with a conventional light microscope requires using a mechanical stage to shift the sample and taking multiple images at various depths, which sets a constraint on the achievable imaging speed and throughput. Moreover, holographic imaging can be performed at a fraction of the size and cost of a conventional bright-field microscope, also covering a much larger field of view. This has enabled a myriad of hand-held devices powered by holography for bio-medical diagnostics and environmental sensing applications. Despite these advantages, the resulting images of a holographic microscope in general suffer from light interference related spatial artifacts, which can limit the achievable contrast in the reconstructed hologram.