Classic double-slit experiment in a new light

18.01. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

An international research team led by physicists from the University of Cologne has implemented a new variant of the basic double-slit experiment using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at the European Synchrotron ESRF in Grenoble. This new variant offers a deeper understanding of the electronic structure of solids. Writing in Science Advances, the research group have now presented their results in a study titled "Resonant inelastic X-ray incarnation of Young's double-slit experiment."

How molecules interact with a laser field

18.01. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

When molecules interact with the oscillating field of a laser, an instantaneous, time-dependent dipole is induced. This very general effect underlies diverse physical phenomena such as optical tweezers, for which Arthur Ashkin received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2018, as well as the spatial alignment of molecules by a laser field. Now scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) report on an experiment in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, where the dependence of the driven-dipole response on the bound state of an electron in an methyl iodine molecule is revealed.

Novel material converts infrared light into visible light (Update)

16.01. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Columbia University scientists, in collaboration with researchers from Harvard, have succeeded in developing a chemical process to absorb infrared light and re-emit it as visible energy, allowing innocuous radiation to penetrate living tissue and other materials without the damage caused by high-intensity light exposure.

Researchers establish principles for transmitting light-delivered data via nonreciprocal circuits

16.01. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

The development of fiber optics technology has been indispensable to increasing the speed at which information is delivered over large distances by relying on light to carry information rather than electricity. Currently, incoming light signals are converted into electrical signals, after which the information they carry is processed. Digital communications and sharing of information would be even faster and more energy efficient if light could be used throughout the entire process, but significant additional advances in integrated optical circuits and light-based computing are still required.

Three-dimensional femtosecond laser nanolithography of crystals

15.01. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Optical properties of materials are based on their chemistry and the inherent subwavelength architecture, although the latter remains to be characterized in depth. Photonic crystals and metamaterials have proven this by providing access through surface alterations to a new level of light manipulation beyond the known natural optical properties of materials. Yet, in the past three decades of research, technical methods have been unable to reliably nanostructure hard optical crystals beyond the material surface for in-depth optical characterization and related applications.

Einstein–de Haas effect offers new insight into a puzzling magnetic phenomenon

15.01. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

More than 100 years ago, Albert Einstein and Wander Johannes de Haas discovered that when they used a magnetic field to flip the magnetic state of an iron bar dangling from a thread, the bar began to rotate.

Scientists discover new ways to twist and shift light

14.01. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

The results from the National Physical Laboratory's (NPL) latest research in photonics could open doors to new quantum technologies and telecoms systems

Next generation photonic memory devices are ‘light-written,’ ultrafast and energy efficient

11.01. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Light is the most energy-efficient way of moving information. Yet, light shows one big limitation: it is difficult to store. As a matter of fact, data centers rely primarily on magnetic hard drives. However, in these hard drives, information is transferred at an energy cost that is nowadays exploding. Researchers of the Institute of Photonic Integration of the Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) have developed a 'hybrid technology' which shows the advantages of both light and magnetic hard drives.

Engineered light could improve health, food, suggests researcher

10.01. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

People who believe light-emitting diodes, or LEDS, are just an efficient upgrade to the ordinary electric light bulb are stuck in their thinking, suggest Sandia National Laboratories researcher Jeff Tsao and colleagues from other institutions in a Nature "Perspectives" article published in late November.

A step closer to a data superhighway for future internet

10.01. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

An international team of researchers led by ANU is helping to build a safe data superhighway for the highly anticipated quantum internet, which promises a new era of artificial intelligence and ultra-secure communication.

Laser triggers electrical activity in thunderstorm for the first time

10.01. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

A team of European scientists has deliberately triggered electrical activity in thunderclouds for the first time, according to a new paper in the latest issue of Optics Express, the Optical Society's (OSA) open-access journal. They did this by aiming high-power pulses of laser light into a thunderstorm.

Optoacoustic microscopy at multiple discrete frequencies

09.01. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Optoacoustic imaging powered by short bursts of continuous wave (CW) lasers can stimulate the emission of ultrasound waves inside an animal or in human subjects. The method can noninvasively capture blood flow and produce 3-D images of cellular microarchitecture. Writing in Light: Science & Applications, Stephan Kellnberger and colleagues at the Institute of Biological and Medical Imaging, now report the possibility of obtaining high-fidelity optoacoustic images with cost-effective lasers controlled at multiple frequencies.

Artificial intelligence detects the presence of viruses

09.01. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Many biosensing applications rely on characterization of specific analytes such as proteins, viruses and bacteria, among many other targets, which can be accomplished by using micro- or nano-scale particles. In such biosensors, these particles are coated with a surface chemistry that makes them stick to the target analyte forming clusters in response. The higher the target analyte concentration is, the larger the number of clusters gets. Therefore, monitoring and characterizing these particle clusters can tell us if the target analyte is present in a sample and in what concentration. Current methods to perform such an analysis are limited in that they are either capable of only a coarse readout or rely on expensive and bulky microscopes, which limit their applicability to address different biosensing needs, especially in resource limited environments.

Scientists realize a three-dimensional ‘topological’ medium for electromagnetic waves

09.01. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Topological insulators are exotic states of matter that physicists have been intensely studying for the past decade. Their most intriguing feature is that they can be rigorously distinguished from all other materials using a mathematical concept known as "topology." This mathematical property grants topological insulators the ability to transport electric signals without dissipation, via special quantum states called "topological surface states."

Researchers discover multilayer band gap using its own technology

08.01. 2019 Optics & Photonics News - Optics, Photonics, Physics News

Korean researchers at DGIST have proven the existence of the upper band gap of atomic rhenium disulfide (ReS2) layers in the conductive atomic structure of ionization energy. The work resulted from a joint study with Professor Jong-hyun Ahn's research team at Yonsei University.