Understanding insulators with conducting edges

16.01. 2019 Quantum Physics News

Insulators that are conducting at their edges hold promise for interesting technological applications. However, until now their characteristics have not been fully understood. Physicists at Goethe University have now modelled what are known as topological insulators with the help of ultracold quantum gases. In the current issue of Physical Review Letters, they demonstrate how the edge states could be experimentally detected.

Quantum scientists demonstrate world-first 3-D atomic-scale quantum chip architecture

07.01. 2019 Quantum Physics News

UNSW researchers at the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) have shown for the first time that they can build atomic precision qubits in a 3-D device—another major step towards a universal quantum computer.

Quantum chemistry on quantum computers

02.01. 2019 Quantum Physics News

Quantum computing and quantum information processing technology have attracted attention in recently emerging fields. Among many important and fundamental issues in science, solving the Schroedinger equation (SE) of atoms and molecules is one of the ultimate goals in chemistry, physics and their related fields. SE is the first principle of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, whose solutions, termed wave functions, can afford any information of electrons within atoms and molecules, predicting their physicochemical properties and chemical reactions.

Machine learning and quantum mechanics team up to understand water at the atomic level

02.01. 2019 Quantum Physics News

Why is water densest at around 4 degrees Celsius? Why does ice float? Why does heavy water have a different melting point compared to normal water? Why do snowflakes have a six-fold symmetry? A collaborative study, led by researchers in EPFL and just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides physical insights into these questions by marrying data-driven machine learning techniques and quantum mechanics.

Hybrid qubits solve key hurdle to quantum computing

28.12. 2018 Quantum Physics News

Spin-based quantum computers have the potential to tackle difficult mathematical problems that cannot be solved using ordinary computers, but many problems remain in making these machines scalable. Now, an international group of researchers led by the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science have crafted a new architecture for quantum computing. By constructing a hybrid device made from two different types of qubit—the fundamental computing element of quantum computers—they have created a device that can be quickly initialized and read out, and that simultaneously maintains high control fidelity.

Quantum tricks to unveil the secrets of topological materials

21.12. 2018 Quantum Physics News

Electrons are not just little spheres, bouncing through a material like a rubber ball. The laws of quantum physics tell us that electrons behave like waves. In some materials, these electron waves can take on rather complicated shapes. The so-called "topological materials" produce electron states that can be very interesting for technical applications, but it is extremely difficult to identify these materials and their associated electronic states.

David vs. Goliath: What a tiny electron can tell us about the structure of the universe

21.12. 2018 Quantum Physics News

What is the shape of an electron? If you recall pictures from your high school science books, the answer seems quite clear: an electron is a small ball of negative charge that is smaller than an atom. This, however, is quite far from the truth.

Quantum Maxwell’s demon ‘teleports’ entropy out of a qubit

20.12. 2018 Quantum Physics News

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, ETH Zurich, and Argonne National Laboratory, U.S, have described an extended quantum Maxwell's demon, a device locally violating the second law of thermodynamics in a system located one to five meters away from the demon. The device could find applications in quantum computers and microscopic refrigerators that cool down tiny objects with pinpoint accuracy. The research was published Dec. 4 in Physical Review B.

Satellite study proves global quantum communication will be possible

20.12. 2018 Quantum Physics News

Researchers in Italy have demonstrated the feasibility of quantum communications between high-orbiting global navigation satellites and a ground station, with an exchange at the single photon level over a distance of 20,000km.

Proposed test of quantum superposition measures ‘quantum revivals’

19.12. 2018 Quantum Physics News

Physicists have proposed an entirely new way to test the quantum superposition principle—the idea that a quantum object can exist in multiple states at the same time. The new test is based on examining the quantum rotation of a macroscopic object—specifically, a nanoscale rotor, which is considered macroscopic despite its tiny size.

First snapshot of exciton-polariton condensation process

18.12. 2018 Quantum Physics News

An ANU advance provides never-before-achieved 'snapshot' of Bose-Einstein condensation.

Scientists design new material to harness power of light

18.12. 2018 Quantum Physics News

Scientists have long known that synthetic materials—called metamaterials—can manipulate electromagnetic waves such as visible light to make them behave in ways that cannot be found in nature. That has led to breakthroughs such as super-high resolution imaging. Now, UMass Lowell is part of a research team that is taking the technology of manipulating light in a new direction.

Researchers demonstrate teleportation using on-demand photons from quantum dots

17.12. 2018 Quantum Physics News

A team of researchers from Austria, Italy and Sweden has successfully demonstrated teleportation using on-demand photons from quantum dots. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group explains how they accomplished this feat and how it applies to future quantum communications networks.

Stretched quantum magnetism uncovered by quantum simulation

13.12. 2018 Quantum Physics News

By studying ultracold atoms trapped in artificial crystals of light, Guillaume Salomon, a postdoc at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics and a team of scientists have been able to directly observe a fundamental effect of one-dimensional quantum systems. By detecting the atoms one-by-one, the team observed a stretching of the magnetic ordering when diluting the atoms in the lattice. The study was conducted this year in the Division led by Immanuel Bloch, a director at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics and professor at the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich. The new findings are relevant, for example, in connection to high-temperature superconductors that conduct electricity without loss.

Stretched quantum magnetism uncovered by quantum simulation

13.12. 2018 Quantum Physics News

By studying ultracold atoms trapped in artificial crystals of light, Guillaume Salomon, a postdoc at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics and a team of scientists have been able to directly observe a fundamental effect of one-dimensional quantum systems. By detecting the atoms one-by-one, the team observed a stretching of the magnetic ordering when diluting the atoms in the lattice. The study was conducted this year in the Division led by Immanuel Bloch, a director at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics and professor at the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich. The new findings are relevant, for example, in connection to high-temperature superconductors that conduct electricity without loss.