A step closer to understanding quantum mechanics: Physicists develop a new quantum simulation protocol

20.10. 2017 Quantum Physics News

For most everyday experiences, such as riding a bicycle, using a lift or catching a ball, classical (Newtonian) mechanics is perfectly accurate.

A step closer to understanding quantum mechanics: Physicists develop a new quantum simulation protocol

20.10. 2017 Quantum Physics News

For most everyday experiences, such as riding a bicycle, using a lift or catching a ball, classical (Newtonian) mechanics is perfectly accurate.

Two teams independently test Tomonaga–Luttinger theory

20.10. 2017 Quantum Physics News

(Phys.org)—Two teams of researchers working independently of one another have found ways to test aspects of the Tomonaga–Luttinger theory that describes interacting quantum particles in 1-D ensembles in a Tomonaga–Luttinger liquid (TLL). The first team, with members from China, Germany and Australia demonstrated TLL behavior with cold atoms in a 1-D array. The second team, with members from Australia, Germany and Russia, tested TLL predictions using a 1-D array of Josephson junctions to look at the impact of disorder in TLL physics. Both teams have published details of their work in Physical Review Letters.

Two teams independently test Tomonaga–Luttinger theory

20.10. 2017 Quantum Physics News

(Phys.org)—Two teams of researchers working independently of one another have found ways to test aspects of the Tomonaga–Luttinger theory that describes interacting quantum particles in 1-D ensembles in a Tomonaga–Luttinger liquid (TLL). The first team, with members from China, Germany and Australia demonstrated TLL behavior with cold atoms in a 1-D array. The second team, with members from Australia, Germany and Russia, tested TLL predictions using a 1-D array of Josephson junctions to look at the impact of disorder in TLL physics. Both teams have published details of their work in Physical Review Letters.

This nanoelectronics breakthrough could lead to more efficient quantum devices

18.10. 2017 Quantum Physics News

Researchers from Concordia have made a breakthrough that could help your electronic devices get even smarter.

Quantum computing—breaking through the 49 qubit simulation barrier

18.10. 2017 Quantum Physics News

Quantum computing is at the threshold of tackling important problems that cannot be efficiently or practically computed by other, more classical means. Getting past this threshold will require us to build, test and operate reliable quantum computers with 50 or more qubits.

Revealing quantum statistics with a pair of distant atoms

17.10. 2017 Quantum Physics News

An international team of researchers has proposed a new way to make atoms or ions indistinguishable by swapping their positions. These particles are then expected to exhibit exotic properties. The study involved physicists from the University of Bonn, the Austrian Academy of Sciences, and the University of California. The work has now been published in Physical Review Letters.

Researchers take a step toward quantum mechanical analysis of plant metabolism

17.10. 2017 Quantum Physics News

Hurricanes, traffic jams, demographic development – to predict the effect of such events, computer simulations are required. Many processes in nature, however, are so complicated that conventional computers fail. Quantum simulators may solve this problem. One of the basic phenomena in nature is the interaction between light and matter in photosynthesis. Physicists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now made a big step towards quantum mechanics understanding of plant metabolism. This is reported in the Nature Communications journal.

Violation of the exponential decay law discovered in open quantum systems

16.10. 2017 Quantum Physics News

(Phys.org)—Ever since the early days of quantum mechanics, the decay dynamics of unstable quantum systems has been thought to follow an exponential decay law, just like the one used to describe radioactive decay and many other natural processes. The exponential law in the quantum domain was originally proposed by George Gamow and later developed by Eugene Wigner and Victor Weisskopf. According to this law, when given a sample of unstable atoms, the number of those that are likely to decay during a brief period of time is proportional to the number of atoms present.

A single photon reveals quantum entanglement of 16 million atoms

13.10. 2017 Quantum Physics News

Quantum theory predicts that a vast number of atoms can be entangled and intertwined by a very strong quantum relationship, even in a macroscopic structure. Until now, however, experimental evidence has been mostly lacking, although recent advances have shown the entanglement of 2,900 atoms. Scientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, recently reengineered their data processing, demonstrating that 16 million atoms were entangled in a one-centimetre crystal. They have published their results in Nature Communications.

Spotting the spin of the Majorana fermion under the microscope

12.10. 2017 Quantum Physics News

Researchers at Princeton University have detected a unique quantum property of an elusive particle notable for behaving simultaneously like matter and antimatter. The particle, known as the Majorana fermion, is prized by researchers for its potential to open the doors to new quantum computing possibilities.

Quantum manipulation power for quantum information processing gets a boost

11.10. 2017 Quantum Physics News

Traditionally, heat engines produce heat from the exchange between high-temperature and low-temperature baths. Now, imagine a heat engine that operates at quantum scale, and a system made up of an atom interacting with light (photons) confined in a reflective cavity of sub-atomic dimensions. This setup can either be at a high or low temperature, emulating the two baths found in conventional heat engines. Controlling the parameters influencing how such quantum heat engine models work could dramatically increase our power to manipulate the quantum states of the coupled atom-cavity, and accelerate our ability to process quantum information. In order for this to work, we have to find new ways of improving the efficiency of quantum heat engines.

Researchers report reversal of current flow in a quantum system

09.10. 2017 Quantum Physics News

In a classical thermodynamic system, heat current flows from the hotter body to the colder one, or electricity from the higher voltage to the lower one. The same thing happens in quantum systems, but this state can be changed, and the flow of energy and particles can be reversed if a quantum observer is inserted into the system.

3-D quantum gas atomic clock offers new dimensions in measurement

05.10. 2017 Quantum Physics News

JILA physicists have created an entirely new design for an atomic clock, in which strontium atoms are packed into a tiny three-dimensional (3-D) cube at 1,000 times the density of previous one-dimensional (1-D) clocks. In doing so, they are the first to harness the ultra-controlled behavior of a so-called "quantum gas" to make a practical measurement device.

Correcting errors at the quantum computing scale

05.10. 2017 Quantum Physics News

Computing power has grown exponentially over many decades, so why is the much-promised next leap of quantum computers taking so long to arrive?