Bioelectronic ‘nose’ can detect food spoilage by sensing the smell of death

06.12. 2017 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Strong odors are an indicator that food has gone bad, but there could soon be a new way to sniff foul smells earlier on. As reported in ACS Nano, researchers have developed a bioelectronic "nose" that can specifically detect a key decay compound at low levels, enabling people to potentially take action before the stink spreads. It can detect rotting food, as well as be used to help find victims of natural disasters or crimes.  

Nanodiscs catch misfolding proteins red-handed

06.12. 2017 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

When proteins misfold, accumulate and clump around insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, they kill cells. Now, researchers, including University of Michigan biophysicists, have obtained a structural snapshot of these proteins when they are most toxic, detailing them down to the atomic level.

Researchers use nanoparticles to target, kill endometrial cancer

04.12. 2017 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Tumor-targeting nanoparticles loaded with a drug that makes cancer cells more vulnerable to chemotherapy's toxicity could be used to treat an aggressive and often deadly form of endometrial cancer, according to new research by the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy.

Cell-derived drug delivery systems

04.12. 2017 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

NUS pharmaceutical scientists have developed a cost-effective method to produce cell-derived nanovesicles (CDNs) for bio-inspired drug delivery applications.

Fighting myocardial infarction with nanoparticle tandems

04.12. 2017 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

How can damaged cardiac tissue following a heart attack best be treated with replacement muscle cells? A research team under the supervision of the University of Bonn reports an innovative method: Muscle replacement cells to take over the function of the damaged tissue are loaded with magnetic nanoparticles. These nanoparticle-loaded cells are then injected into the damaged heart muscle and held in place by a magnet, causing the cells to engraft better onto the existing tissue. Using a mouse model, the scientists show that this leads to a significant improvement in heart function. The results are published online in Biomaterials.

Rapid, cost-effective genetic screening within reach

30.11. 2017 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

CU Boulder researchers are developing new techniques for faster, more cost-effective single-molecule DNA sequencing that could have transformative impacts on genetic screening, paving the way for advances in vaccine development, early cancer detection and organ transplants.

Drug-delivering nanoparticles seek and destroy elusive cancer stem cells

27.11. 2017 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

University of Illinois researchers are sending tiny drug-laden nanoparticles on a mission to seek and destroy cancer stem cells, the elusive and rare cells that can cause cancer to come back even when years have passed since the initial tumor was treated.

Nanoparticles could allow for faster, better medicine

20.11. 2017 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Gold nanoparticles could help make drugs act more quickly and effectively, according to new research conducted at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Breakthrough discovery in diagnostic tools that can replace commonly used and fragile antibodies

17.11. 2017 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Experts from the Biotechnology Group at the University of Leicester led by Professor Sergey Piletsky in collaboration with the spin-off company MIP Diagnostics Ltd have announced the development of polymeric materials with molecular recognition capabilities which hold the potential to outperform natural antibodies in various diagnostic applications

Zipping DNA

13.11. 2017 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

ETH researchers have developed a method that allows large amounts of genetic information to be compressed and then decompressed again in cells. This could aid in the development of new therapies.

Theranostic nanoparticles for tracking and monitoring disease state

09.11. 2017 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Although the most basic definition of a "theranostic" nanoparticle is a nanoparticle that simply has a therapeutic moiety and imaging or diagnostic moiety on the same particle, the authors of a new SLAS Technology review article pay particular attention to and emphasize the platforms in which self-reporting and disease monitoring is possible in real-time through the synergistic nature of the components on the theranostic particles.

Nanoparticles can limit inflammation by distracting the immune system

09.11. 2017 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

A surprise finding suggests that an injection of nanoparticles may be able to help fight the immune system when it goes haywire, researchers at the University of Michigan have shown. The nanoparticles divert immune cells that cause inflammation away from an injury site.

Nanoshells could deliver more chemo with fewer side effects

08.11. 2017 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Researchers investigating ways to deliver high doses of cancer-killing drugs inside tumors have shown they can use a laser and light-activated gold nanoparticles to remotely trigger the release of approved cancer drugs inside cancer cells in laboratory cultures.

Age-old malaria treatment found to improve nanoparticle delivery to tumors

06.11. 2017 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

A new study shows that a 70-year-old malaria drug can block immune cells in the liver so nanoparticles can arrive at their intended tumor site, overcoming a significant hurdle of targeted drug delivery, according to a team of researchers led by Houston Methodist.

Subset of carbon nanotubes poses cancer risk similar to asbestos in mice

06.11. 2017 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Nanotechnology, the science of developing materials containing very small fibers, is having a growing influence on daily life. Now researchers have shown for the first time in mice that long and thin nanomaterials called carbon nanotubes may have the same carcinogenic effect as asbestos: they can induce the formation of mesothelioma. The findings were observed in 10%-25% of the 32 animals included in the study, which has not yet been replicated in humans. The work appears November 6 in Current Biology.