Many colours from a single dot

19.02. 2018 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Physicists Bart van Dam and Katerina Newell (Dohnalova) from the UvA Institute of Physics, in collaboration with Emanuele Marino and Peter Schall as well as colleagues from the University of Twente and Jiljin University in China, have shown that a single nanoparticle can be used to emit different colours of light. Their results, which were published in the nano- and microphysics journal Small, show that the particles under consideration may be a very efficient and versatile tool to produce light of all colours at tiny scales.

Researchers invent light-emitting nanoantennas

19.02. 2018 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. Such nanosources are based on subwavelength nanoparticles serving both as emitters and nanoantennas and allow enhancing light emission inherently without additional devices. Moreover, perovskite enables tuning of emission spectra throughout the visible range by varying the composition of the material. This makes the new nanoparticles a promising platform for creating compact optoelectronic devices such as optical chips, light-emitting diodes, or sensors. The results were published in Nano Letters.

Contacting the molecular world through graphene nanoribbons

19.02. 2018 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

A single molecule can behave as the smallest electronic component of an electronic system. Researchers in the field of molecular electronics have endeavoured in recent years to develop new approaches to using molecules as electronic logic components.

Researchers create first superatomic 2-D semiconductor

16.02. 2018 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Atoms are the basic building blocks of all matter—at least, that is the conventional picture. In a new study, researchers have fabricated the first superatomic 2-D semiconductor, a material whose basic units aren't atoms but superatoms—atomic clusters that exhibit some of the properties of one or more individual atoms. The researchers expect that the new material is just the first member of what will become a new family of 2-D semiconductors whose superatomic structures will greatly expand the diversity, functionality, and applications of 2-D materials.

Squeezing into the best shape

15.02. 2018 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Until now, producing liquids that can be shaped and reshaped on demand hasn't been possible. Scientists discovered a simple way to form stabilized droplets in a variety of structures. Tightly packed nanoparticle-polymer assemblies at droplet surfaces were squeezed into desired shapes assemblies with an electric field. This new approach is a simple route to form droplets of one liquid phase in another liquid. This could lead to the continuous production of discrete, responsive, and reconfigurable all-liquid systems.

Squeezing into the best shape

15.02. 2018 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Until now, producing liquids that can be shaped and reshaped on demand hasn't been possible. Scientists discovered a simple way to form stabilized droplets in a variety of structures. Tightly packed nanoparticle-polymer assemblies at droplet surfaces were squeezed into desired shapes assemblies with an electric field. This new approach is a simple route to form droplets of one liquid phase in another liquid. This could lead to the continuous production of discrete, responsive, and reconfigurable all-liquid systems.

Researchers devise a new, inexpensive way to fabricate microneedles

15.02. 2018 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Getting an injection at the doctor's office is never a fun thing, but a new approach is on the horizon, using what are called microneedles, arrays of tiny needles that deliver medication through the skin without causing pain. But fabricating microneedles is costly, requiring cleanrooms and expensive equipment.

Researchers devise a new, inexpensive way to fabricate microneedles

15.02. 2018 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Getting an injection at the doctor's office is never a fun thing, but a new approach is on the horizon, using what are called microneedles, arrays of tiny needles that deliver medication through the skin without causing pain. But fabricating microneedles is costly, requiring cleanrooms and expensive equipment.

A single magnetic skyrmion detected at room temperature for the first time

14.02. 2018 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

A team of researchers from CNRS, Thales and the Université Paris-Saclay, all in France has for the first time detected a single skyrmion at room temperature. In their paper published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, the group describes their efforts, what they achieved and future avenues of research efforts.

Microscopy breakthrough paves the way for atomically precise manufacturing

12.02. 2018 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

A University of Texas at Dallas graduate student, his advisor and industry collaborators believe they have addressed a long-standing problem troubling scientists and engineers for more than 35 years: How to prevent the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope from crashing into the surface of a material during imaging or lithography.

Scientists observe nanowires as they grow

09.02. 2018 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

At DESY's X-ray source PETRA III, scientists have followed the growth of tiny wires of gallium arsenide live. Their observations reveal exact details of the growth process responsible for the evolving shape and crystal structure of the crystalline nanowires. The findings also provide new approaches to tailoring nanowires with desired properties for specific applications. The scientists, headed by Philipp Schroth of the University of Siegen and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), published their findings in the journal Nano Letters. The semiconductor gallium arsenide (GaAs) is widely used in infrared remote controls, the high-frequency components of mobile phones and for converting electrical signals into light for fibre optical transmission, as well as in solar panels for deployment in spacecraft.

First 3-D imaging of excited quantum dots

08.02. 2018 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Quantum dots are rapidly taking center stage in emerging applications and research developments, from enhanced LCD TVs and thin-film solar cells, to high-speed data transfer and fluorescent labeling in biomedical applications.

Organic vortex lasers could be used in future 3-D displays

08.02. 2018 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Researchers have developed a new type of organic vortex laser, which is a laser that emits a helical beam of light. In the future, miniature arrays of these vortex lasers, each with a slightly different spiral shape, may be used in applications such as 3D TV displays, microscopy, and as information carriers for visible light communications.

A fast and efficient method for graphene nanoribbon synthesis

08.02. 2018 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Nanographenes are attracting wide interest from many researchers as a powerful candidate for the next generation of carbon materials due to their unique electric properties. Scientists at Nagoya University have now developed a fast way to form nanographenes in a controlled fashion. This simple and powerful method for nanographene synthesis could help generate a range of novel optoelectronic materials, such as organic electroluminescent displays and solar cells.

Fast-spinning spheres show nanoscale systems’ secrets

07.02. 2018 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Spin a merry-go-round fast enough and the riders fly off in all directions. But the spinning particles in a Rice University lab do just the opposite.