Innovative nanocoating technology harnesses sunlight to degrade microplastics

21.02. 2019 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Low density polyethylene film (LDPE) microplastic fragments successfully degraded in water using visible-light-excited heterogeneous ZnO photocatalysts. The innovative nanocoating technology was developed by a research team from KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.

Thermally-painted metasurfaces yield perfect light absorbers for high-tech applications

20.02. 2019 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Researchers have discovered that the ancient technique of heating metal to create vibrant colors creates a nanostructured surface that acts as a perfect light absorber. Perfect light absorbers—materials that absorb more than 99% of a certain color—can be used for sensing, solar panels, anti-counterfeiting and stealth technologies.

The holy grail of nanowire production

20.02. 2019 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Nanowires have the potential to revolutionize the technology around us. Measuring just 5-100 nanometers in diameter (a nanometer is a millionth of a millimeter), these tiny, needle-shaped crystalline structures can alter how electricity or light passes through them.

GraphON: Conductive coatings and materials breakthrough

20.02. 2019 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Australia's national science agency, CSIRO, has created a breakthrough new form of graphitic material that's conductive, easy to apply and offers greater control over performance than graphene.

Dose of vitamin C helps gold nanowires grow

19.02. 2019 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

A boost of vitamin C helped Rice University scientists turn small gold nanorods into fine gold nanowires.

Breakthrough in the search for graphene-based electronics

19.02. 2019 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

For 15 years, scientists have tried to exploit the "miracle material" graphene to produce nanoscale electronics. On paper, graphene should be great for just that: it is ultra-thin—only one atom thick and therefore two-dimensional, it is excellent for conducting electrical current, and holds great promise for future forms of electronics that are faster and more energy efficient. In addition, graphene consists of carbon atoms – of which we have an unlimited supply.

Nano-droplets are the key to controlling membrane formation

19.02. 2019 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

The creation of membranes is of enormous importance in biology, but also in many chemical applications developed by humans. These membranes are shaped spontaneously when soap-like molecules in water join together. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology now have a clear picture of the entire process. Membrane formation turns out to start with nano-droplets in the water with a higher concentration of soap-like molecules. If you can control those nanodroplets, you can control shape, thickness and size of the membranes. This is of great importance for, among other things, the development of new nanomedicines. The results are published in Nature Chemistry.

Firefly-inspired surfaces improve efficiency of LED lightbulbs

19.02. 2019 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

A new type of light-emitting diode lightbulb could one day light homes and reduce power bills, according to Penn State researchers who suggest that LEDs made with firefly-mimicking structures could improve efficiency.

3-D printed nanomaterial shows different transparencies and colours

15.02. 2019 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Metallic nanoparticles have been used as glass colorants since the Roman Empire. One of the most famous pieces of pottery from the period is the Lycurgus cup. The nanoparticles embedded in this cup have an optical peculiarity, presenting different colours depending on the angle of the illumination. This effect is called dichroism. Now, scientists from Wageningen University & Research have made 3-D printed objects showing this dichroic effect.

3-D printed nanomaterial shows different transparencies and colours

15.02. 2019 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Metallic nanoparticles have been used as glass colorants since the Roman Empire. One of the most famous pieces of pottery from the period is the Lycurgus cup. The nanoparticles embedded in this cup have an optical peculiarity, presenting different colours depending on the angle of the illumination. This effect is called dichroism. Now, scientists from Wageningen University & Research have made 3-D printed objects showing this dichroic effect.

3-D printed nanomaterial shows different transparencies and colours

15.02. 2019 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Metallic nanoparticles have been used as glass colorants since the Roman Empire. One of the most famous pieces of pottery from the period is the Lycurgus cup. The nanoparticles embedded in this cup have an optical peculiarity, presenting different colours depending on the angle of the illumination. This effect is called dichroism. Now, scientists from Wageningen University & Research have made 3-D printed objects showing this dichroic effect.

Tiny particles can switch back and forth between phases

15.02. 2019 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Three years ago, when Richard Robinson, associate professor of materials science and engineering, was on sabbatical at Hebrew University in Israel, he asked a graduate student to send him some nanoparticles of a specific size.

Tiny particles can switch back and forth between phases

15.02. 2019 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Three years ago, when Richard Robinson, associate professor of materials science and engineering, was on sabbatical at Hebrew University in Israel, he asked a graduate student to send him some nanoparticles of a specific size.

Tiny particles can switch back and forth between phases

15.02. 2019 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Three years ago, when Richard Robinson, associate professor of materials science and engineering, was on sabbatical at Hebrew University in Israel, he asked a graduate student to send him some nanoparticles of a specific size.

Superior noise control using graphene

13.02. 2019 Nanotechnology News - Nanoscience, Nanotechnolgy, Nanotech News

Noise is a dangerous worldwide environmental pollutant: at normal levels found in cities it can induce annoyance, stress and fluctuations in sleep patterns which in turn increase the risk of type-2 diabetes, arterial hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke.